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35. Color & Three-D Art – Foundations A

35. Color & Three-D Art – Foundations A

COURSE
Foundations (year A)
76 Weekly lessons/2 school years
LENGTH 
1 hour & 45 minutes
or two 52-minute lessons
AGES
Grades 3-5
& Grades 6-12
DATE
Week of May 1 – 5
2017

L E S S O N P L A N

Overview: Continuing last week, where they began 2 projects, students will first add watercolor to their expressive animal ink drawings. Then they continue with corrugated cardboard to build their interlocking panel sculptures. Today they’ll finish building the sculpture, and then they’ll prime with gesso. Next week is finishing and painting the surface.

T E A C H T O O L S Everything you need to get your classroom ready is in the TEACHTOOLS section, below the LESSONPLAN. This button jumps right to it. Learn the objectives and focus of each lesson, and print a prep-page PDF, including checklists and an “at a glance” outline of the lesson.

Tap any underlined words for a pop-up definition or mini-lesson. On some tablets, you may need to tap/pause/tap again to dismiss these.

That’s all you need to know. Use your tablet or smartphone, and just start teaching!

 Lesson at a Glance
1. Setup 5 Minutes – Setup for watercolor
2. Review 5 min – Review watercolors
3. Watercolor 25 min – Finish expressive animal
4. Build 15 min – Continue 3D Project
5. Cleanup 2 min – Cleanup or organize
B R E A K – If dividing into two lessons.
6. Finish Building 25 min – Finish 3D project
7. Demo 5 min – Demo priming
8. Prime 5 min – Prime 3D project
9. Cleanup 15 min – Everyone helps

STEP 1. Setup

Students will setup for watercolor.

5 Minutes Tap the timer buttons to open a countdown in a new tab.

M A T E R I A L S

  • Expressive animal ink drawing on watercolor paper (from last week)
  • Acrylic paints
  • Brushes – all sizes
  • 2 Containers for water (one is to make paint)
  • Eye droppers
  • Smocks
  • Paper towels
  • Cheasel reference stand & clip

1. If a Student Missed…

If anyone missed last week, they should skip the expressive animal project and get caught up on the cardboard sculpture. Use the PDF below to get them jump-started on the project and begin drawing ideas for it.

P R I N T
Cardboard Sculpture Instructions – 1 page

Tap the image to open the pdf in a new tab or window. Print a few so you can give them to any students who missed last week’s lesson.

2. Watercolor Setup

 

Set up work area for painting watercolors using acrylic paints. Have students get 2 Water Tubs each.

 

Advanced Students in their 3rd or 4th year

To come soon

Tap to open the CREATIONS Instructions PDF. Print and cut down the middle for two instruction sheets. Provide to your advanced students so they can know the steps to follow for their advanced version of this lesson.

T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 2. Review

Students will review watercolor techniques.

5 Minutes

1. Watercolor Made Easy

After years of teaching, we finally found one simple instruction that instantly helps students “get it”. They will bypass most of the frustration that people have in learning to work with watercolors. (This is for all dry paper techniques.)

The brush should not touch the paper. 

This is now our most important point with watercolors; the point of a lifetime! If you know watercolor, you understand that the brush can actually touch the paper, but this instruction is amazing because it changes people’s initial approach to the medium. It helps students make the paradigm shift from regular painting techniques. This shift usually involves tons of frustration and practice, and often causes people to abandon watercolors altogether.

Old School: “Artists either hate watercolors or they love it…
but most hate it.”

ArtSquish: “All my students love watercolor!”

Starting out with the idea of “not touching the brush to the paper”, instantly solves the 3 most difficult aspects of learning watercolor technique: 1) a very light touch 2) keeping enough paint on the paper, and 3) understanding that you must leave the watercolor alone as it settles and dries.

Show your students these graphics, and explain the concept.

 S L I D E S H O W

Point of a Lifetime • Tap to open - Scroll to view - Pinch to zoom
WatercolorBrush_illust1

WatercolorBrush_illust2

WatercolorBrushillust

2. Make Watercolors with Acrylics

Create simple and inexpensive student-grade watercolors by thoroughly mixing some acrylics into water until it’s completely dissolved. Eye droppers can move water to the palette easily. Use one tub of water for creating paint, and the other one for cleaning the brush.

T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 3. Watercolor

Students will finish their expressive animal with watercolor.

25 Minutes

M A T E R I A L S

  • Expressive animal ink drawing on watercolor paper from last week
  • Acrylic paints
  • Brushes – all sizes
  • Container for water
  • Eye droppers
  • Smocks
  • Paper towels
  • Cheasel reference stand & clip

1. Paint 

Finish the expressive animal ink drawing by adding watercolor.

2. Less is More

“Often with watercolors, the less you, the better it looks. Remember to leave it alone once you put some color down. The colors move around on their own, and if you disturb the process, it will not look good when it dries.”

Teacher, (read verbatim or paraphrase)
Teacher

3. Lookout for Thick Paint!

Make sure your students make watercolor, not runny acrylics. There should be no chunks or thickness to the paint at all.

4. Encourage!

5. Sign & Set Aside

T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 4. Build

Students continue to build their 3D project.

15 Minutes

M A T E R I A L S

  • Flat cardboard
  • 4B Pencil
  • Eraser
  • Scissors or box cutter – FOR TEACHERS ONLY
  • Hot glue gun – For Teachers, unless you have students who are capable and a low-temp gun
  • Tape – 1″ and 2″ wide masking tape for securing joints and taping edges if desired

1. Draw Shape outlines

Students should use flat pieces of cardboard with no folds, and draw each of their shapes at the size they want.

2. Students do not Cut

Everyone should be patient and wait their turn for the teacher and any adult helpers to cut cardboard.

3. How to Cut Cardboard

Hot glue alone is not strong enough to hold the structure together, even with tape reinforcements. The cardboard itself can become it’s own support though, if you create slots. Practice cutting a slot or two before class. Once you get going on it, you’ll find it’s pretty easy.

Always be very careful with a knife and follow these guidelines for safety.

  • Cut with the knife pushing towards a wall or inaccessible space, and away from your own person too.
  • Always have a super sharp blade to prevent pushing the knife too hard. Change blades often.
  • Make sure no one near will accidentally reach in where you are cutting “to help”. Explain this and be watching for it.
  • Use a retractable knife and keep it in your pocket when not using.

Our favorite knife closes like a pocket knife and has a quick-release button for changing blades.

 S L I D E S H O W

Cutting Slots • Tap to open - Scroll to view - Pinch to zoom

Cutting a slot on both pieces allows them to hold each other. The slots must be the same width as the cardboard, and be cut halfway the amount that you want the pieces to overlap. This join overlaps the entire piece, so halfway on each piece works.

Here’s a join where one piece is twice the height of the other. In this case, the two slots must equal the height of the short piece only.

You need two cardboard pieces you want to join, a pencil, a cutting surface, and a ruler. We used white cardboard so you can see it easily, but most cardboard is kraft brown. Also, these are double-ply. The slot is wider, but one-ply works just the same way.

Find the spot on each piece where you will join them and make a mark on both.

Align the bottom edge of both pieces, and make a mark at the height of the lowest piece where the join will be.

Place a ruler to measure the height of the join on the bigger piece. You don’t actually have to find the halfway mark. Here, I chose 1″ because it’s close enough for stability, and it’s really easy. All I have to do is make a mark exactly 1″ down from the TOP of the shorter piece.

Measure DOWN 1″ from the top of the other piece – always the shorter one if they’re not the same height.

Trace tightly around the edge of the other piece of cardboard to get the perfect fit.

Cut the slot out on each piece.

Slide them together.

The finished pieces join nicely!

 

4. Connect Pieces

Slide slots together. If they seem wobbly or weak, add some hot glue and/or masking tape. Do not use packing tape because paint will not adhere to it.

5. Add Extra Elements

We like to have bailing wire on hand and a couple of pliers and/or wire cutters. Bend the tips right after you cut the wire. Make a small curl so that there is not a sharp point.

The wire can be inserted into the cardboard edges. If you bend it with a wave or two, the inserted part will not turn inside. Secure with some hot glue and the edge.

You can tape another piece to the end of the wire for a floating element. Again, bend the wire into a wave or loop where the flat cardboard should attach, and tape the floating piece to it. If you just tape a straight piece of wire to the cardboard, the wire can spin inside the tape so the structure will not maintain its integrity.

Other items that can be used:

  1. Small boxes
  2. Paper towel tubes
  3. Soda straws
  4. plastic parts of any kind
  5. Small bits of cardboard can also be glued on the structure
T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 5. Cleanup

Students help cleanup or organize their work spaces if dividing into two sessions.

2 Minutes

1. Be Careful!

If dividing into 2 sessions. If not, it’s good to organize the room anyway, so things don’t get lost. Toss unwanted scraps away but be careful to make sure they are not part of someone else’s project or big enough to be useful.

B R E A K – This is the end of part one, if you’re dividing into two lessons.
T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 6. Finish Building

Students will finish their 3D project.

25 Minutes

M A T E R I A L S

  • Flat cardboard
  • 4B Pencil
  • Eraser
  • Scissors or box cutter – FOR TEACHERS ONLY
  • Hot glue gun
  • Tape

1. Complete the Sculpture

Everyone continues until their project is finished and sturdy.

2. Tape Edges (Optional)

Tape edges if desired and if there is enough time.

  1. Center the tape on an edge with part of the tape extending out to each side.
  2. Bend the tape down and press to secure.
  3. For curves, snip the tape on the sides every half inch or so before bending down and securing.
T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 7. DEMO

Students will learn how to prime with gesso.

5 Minutes

M A T E R I A L S

  • Cardboard
  • Gesso in a small disposable cup – only 1 or 2 inches deep so students only “dip the tip”
  • House painting brush
  • Paper towel

1. Three Steps

Watch the video below so you can use someone’s sculpture or some scrap to demonstrate how to prime with gesso.

  1. Move the primer – Dip the Tip of the brush only
  2. Spread the primer – inside an imaginary rectangle – spread it out until thin an streaky
  3. Feather finish – Make it look good with a very light touch – No blobs or drips

 V I D E O

Priming D E M O • Tap to open - Tap the ArtSquish logo to enlarge

2. No Blobs or Drips!

“Make sure you spread out any of the thick parts of the gesso. There should be no blobs or drips. You will see through it, and it should be streaky. If you have it looking like white paint, then you are using way too much of the gesso.”

Teacher, (read verbatim or paraphrase)
Teacher
T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 8. Prime

Students will prime their sculpture with gesso.

5 Minutes

M A T E R I A L S

  • Cardboard
  • Gesso in a small disposable cups – only 1 or 2 inches deep so students only “dip the tip”
  • House painting brushes
  • Paper towel

1. Prime your Sculptures

Help students with the three steps and making sure there are no blobs and drips. Explain that this is not paint. It’s a thin coating to help the paint stick to the cardboard.

2. Inscribe Name

Use a pencil to inscribe or write name on the primed sculpture.

3. Set Aside to Dry

4. Early Finishers

Help clean up and organize the room, and then have artists choice or walk around and help others.

T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

STEP 9. Cleanup

Students help clean up scraps, organize, and wash brushes.

15 Minutes

M A T E R I A L S

  • Paper towels

1. Clean up checklist:

 Super wash brushes

• Empty water containers

• Put art supplies away (sop up runny paint before disposing of palette paper)

• Wipe tables & clean up trash

• Remove smocks

• Collect &/or distribute artwork – NAMES

• Check for personal items on tables and floors

2. Take photos of artwork!

3. Make sure you see the kids connect with parents and tell them about the class if you can!

T E A C H T O O L S  Top of Page

G A L L E R Y

Student Work • Tap to open - Scroll to view - Pinch to zoom

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

T E A C H T O O L S

Everything you need to make your lesson work

  1. Practice and improvement in using watercolors and 3D elements
  2. Understanding what gesso and primer are, and how to apply it
  3. Accomplishment in building a sculpture and finishing their ink animal in color
  4. Fulfillment from freedom of expression in color and cardboard shapes

Be on the lookout for

Bent Cardboard – once you have a bent piece, it just won’t work. Floppy sculptures are no fun.

Intricate Designs – Cardboard is hard to cut and even harder to cut small shapes and curves into. Keep it simple, and don’t be afraid to send your students back to the drawing board. (couldn’t resist!)

• Primer– A paint-like substance that prepares a surface for painting. It must be spread thin to work properly, since primer (gesso, for artists), is a connector. It allows paint to stick to the surface better..

Tip of the day: Keep lots of extra box-cutter blades on hand. A plastic dispenser can go in a pocket for safety. Use masking tape for blade disposal: set the used blade with the sharp edge down the middle of a piece of masking or painters’ tape. Then place another piece of tape on top, embedding the edge of the blade in the center of the two pieces of tape.
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F O C U S

Each bar represents how much of the lesson involves that kind of training.
Insights for the brain – Techniques for the hand – Expression for the heart

Insights
Techniques
Expression

P R E P A R A T I O N

Print your Prep-Page

Tap the circle graphic to open the ArtSquish Prep-Page PDF in a new window.  – includes the Checklist, Roomprep, and a Lesson-at-a-glance overview.

R O O M P R E P : Have all ink animal drawings out and ready to go. Have a supply of flat cardboard and a safe area ready for cutting with a surface that you can cut on, such as extra unusable cardboard. (only teachers can cut.) Use a retractable box cutter and have lots of blades.

M A T E R I A L S

  • Expressive animal ink drawing on watercolor paper (from last week)
  • Cheasels
  • Water containers
  • Eye droppers
  • Smocks
  • Paper towels
  • Flat cardboard
  • Scissors or box cutters – FOR TEACHERS ONLY
  • Hot glue gun
  • Tape
  • Gesso
  • disposable cups
  • House painting brush

Materials each student will need:

  • 14″ x 17″ sketch pad
  • Acrylic paints
  • Brushes – all sizes
  • Palette pad
  • 4B Pencils
  • Erasers
  • Tape
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P R E V I E W

Week #36: Painted 3D Art
May 8 – 12

Everyone paints their project and finishes it up. Early finishers can complete other works in progress or color journals, and then have Artists’ Choice.

Week #37: Repeat & Focus
May 15 – 19

Two important elements of design, Repetition and Emphasis, are learned by drawing a repeating image and making one stand out with the use of color and value.

I N F O R M

Use this button to view our parent blog. Share the link: http://parentart.org so your student’s parents can read about the lesson each week.

About The Author

Dennas Davis

Dennas is the founder of Firstlight Arts Academy in Nashville, and also of The Art Instructor (formerly ArtSquish). He has been designing, painting, illustrating and teaching in various combinations since he learned how to hold a crayon. He is the illustrator of 24 children's books with over 5 million in print worldwide. See his paintings at http://dennasd.com

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